Use of Electromagnetic Midsagittal Articulography in the Study of Swallowing The tongue functions as the primary articulator during the oropharyngeal stages of swallowing. However, detailed descriptions of the kinematics and spatiotemporal variability of tongue behaviors during swallowing are limited to a handful of analyses of data from the X-ray microbeam database. In this article, a new technique, electromagnetic midsagittal articulography ... Research Note
Research Note  |   April 01, 2004
Use of Electromagnetic Midsagittal Articulography in the Study of Swallowing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Catriona M. Steele
    University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Pascal H. H. M. Van Lieshout
    University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: catriona.steele@utoronto.ca
  • Contact author: Catriona M. Steele, PhD, Graduate Department of Speech Pathology, University of Toronto, 500 University Avenue, Mail Room 160, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1V7. E-mail: catriona.steele@utoronto.ca
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   April 01, 2004
Use of Electromagnetic Midsagittal Articulography in the Study of Swallowing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2004, Vol. 47, 342-352. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/027)
History: Received May 21, 2003 , Accepted September 20, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2004, Vol. 47, 342-352. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/027)
History: Received May 21, 2003; Accepted September 20, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 31

The tongue functions as the primary articulator during the oropharyngeal stages of swallowing. However, detailed descriptions of the kinematics and spatiotemporal variability of tongue behaviors during swallowing are limited to a handful of analyses of data from the X-ray microbeam database. In this article, a new technique, electromagnetic midsagittal articulography (EMMA), is introduced for the high-resolution description of oral articulatory movements during swallowing. Data from 8 healthy, nondysphagic participants are used to illustrate the methods used for data collection and analysis. Movement data were collected for 3 fleshpoint positions on the tongue (blade, body, dorsum) during sequences of repeated discrete water swallows, and were characterized for variables of spatiotemporal variability and 4 discrete kinematic parameters (movement amplitude, peak velocity, duration, and kinematic stiffness). These data show that the movement trajectories measured using EMMA are consistent with descriptions from previous X-ray microbeam studies, indicating that EMMA is a feasible method for the detailed study of tongue movements during swallowing.

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