Variations in Articulatory Movement With Changes in Speech Task Studies of normal and disordered articulatory movement often rely on the use of short, simple speech tasks. However, the severity of speech disorders can be observed to vary markedly with task. Understanding task-related variations in articulatory kinematic behavior may allow for an improved understanding of normal and disordered speech motor ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2004
Variations in Articulatory Movement With Changes in Speech Task
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephen M. Tasko
    Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo
  • Michael D. McClean
    Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo
  • Contact author: Stephen M. Tasko, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008. e-mail: Stephen.tasko@wmich.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2004
Variations in Articulatory Movement With Changes in Speech Task
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 85-100. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/008)
History: Received February 9, 2003 , Accepted July 21, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 85-100. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/008)
History: Received February 9, 2003; Accepted July 21, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 40

Studies of normal and disordered articulatory movement often rely on the use of short, simple speech tasks. However, the severity of speech disorders can be observed to vary markedly with task. Understanding task-related variations in articulatory kinematic behavior may allow for an improved understanding of normal and disordered speech motor behavior in varying communication contexts. This study evaluated how orofacial kinematic behavior varies as a function of speaking task in a group of 15 healthy male speakers. The speech tasks included a nonsense phrase with a high frequency of stop consonants, a sentence, an oral reading passage, and a spontaneous monologue. In addition, rate and intensity conditions were varied for the nonsense phrase and sentence. The articulatory positions of the upper lip, lower lip, tongue blade, and mandible were recorded, and measures reflecting (a) average features of individual movements or strokes (i.e., peak speed, distance, and duration) and (b) overall spatial variability of the articulators for each task were extracted, derived, and analyzed. Results showed a number of task- and condition-related differences in speech kinematic behavior. The most prominent result from the task comparison was that the nonsense speech task exhibited larger, faster, and longer movement strokes than the other speech tasks. For some articulators (lower lip and tongue), there were task-related differences in spatial variability. Changes in loudness and rate revealed variation in kinematic measures that were often complicated by articulator identity and task type. The results suggest that an expanded range of speech tasks and conditions may aid in the study of normal and disordered speech motor behavior.

Acknowledgments
Data acquisition on this study was carried out in the Audiology and Speech Center at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, and was approved by the Walter Reed Army Medical Center Human Use Committee (Washington, DC), under Department of Clinical Investigation Work Unit 2585. All participants enrolled in the study voluntarily agreed to participate and gave written and informed consent. Data analysis and manuscript preparation were carried out at Western Michigan University. The research was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant DC 03659. The opinions or assertions herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.
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