Respiratory Kinematics During Vocalization and Nonspeech Respiration in Children From 9 to 48 Months The development of respiratory drive for vocalization was studied by observing chest wall kinematics longitudinally in 4 typically developing children from the age of 9 to 48 months. Measurements of the relative contribution of rib cage and abdominal movement during vocalization (i.e., babbling and true words) and rest breathing were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2004
Respiratory Kinematics During Vocalization and Nonspeech Respiration in Children From 9 to 48 Months
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn P. Connaghan
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Christopher A. Moore
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Masahiko Higashakawa
    Osaka Medical College, Osaka, Japan
  • Contact author: Christopher A. Moore, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, 1417 NE 42nd Street, Seattle, Washington 98105-6246. E-mail: camoore@u.washington.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2004
Respiratory Kinematics During Vocalization and Nonspeech Respiration in Children From 9 to 48 Months
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 70-84. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/007)
History: Received March 18, 2003 , Accepted July 21, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 70-84. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/007)
History: Received March 18, 2003; Accepted July 21, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

The development of respiratory drive for vocalization was studied by observing chest wall kinematics longitudinally in 4 typically developing children from the age of 9 to 48 months. Measurements of the relative contribution of rib cage and abdominal movement during vocalization (i.e., babbling and true words) and rest breathing were obtained every 3 months using respiratory plethysmography (RespitraceTM). Extending earlier findings in 15-month-olds, 2 methods of analysis of rib cage and abdominal movement were used: (a) a dynamic index of the strength of coupling between the rib cage and abdomen, and (b) a classification scheme describing the moment-by-moment changes in each of the 2 components (C. A. Moore, T. J. Caulfield, & J. R. Green, 2001). The developmental course of relative chest wall kinematics differed between vocalization and rest breathing. The coupling of rib cage and abdomen during vocalization weakened significantly with development, whereas it remained consistently strong for rest breathing throughout the observed period. The developmental changes in frequency of occurrence of relative moment-by-moment changes varied across movement type. The results support previous findings that speech breathing is distinct from rest breathing based on the relative contributions of the rib cage and abdomen. Longitudinal changes are likely responsive to anatomic development, including changes to rib cage shape and compliance.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a research grant (R01 DC00822) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and by the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Washington, Seattle. Preliminary results of this investigation were presented at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in San Antonio, TX, November 1998.
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