Duration Discrimination in Listeners With Cochlear Hearing Loss Effects of Stimulus Type and Frequency Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2004
Duration Discrimination in Listeners With Cochlear Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John H. Grose
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Joseph W. Hall, III
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Emily Buss
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Contact author: John H. Grose, PhD, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, 610 Burnett-Womack Building, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7070. E-mail: jhg@med.unc.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2004
Duration Discrimination in Listeners With Cochlear Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 5-12. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/001)
History: Received July 10, 2002 , Accepted May 19, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 5-12. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/001)
History: Received July 10, 2002; Accepted May 19, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

This study examined the effects of cochlear hearing loss on the ability to discriminate increments in the duration of a stimulus under conditions where the frequency and/or amplitude of the stimulus change dynamically. Three stimulus types were used: pure tones, frequency-modulated tones, and narrow bands of noise. The carrier/center frequency of each 250-ms stimulus either remained constant at 1035 Hz or varied randomly from presentation to presentation across the frequency range 432–2804 Hz. Two groups of listeners participated: 9 with bilateral cochlear hearing loss and 7 with normal hearing sensitivity. The results showed no differences in performance between the 2 groups. However, both groups showed poorer duration discrimination for the conditions where the carrier/center frequency changed randomly than for the conditions where the carrier/center frequency remained constant. In addition, performance was poorer for the narrowband noise stimuli than for the tonal stimuli. This pattern of results suggests that across-frequency temporal judgments are more difficult than isofrequency temporal judgments, but that cochlear hearing loss does not exacerbate this difficulty per se.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01-DC01507.
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