Phonological Representations in Children With SLI A Study of French Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2004
Phonological Representations in Children With SLI
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christelle Maillart
    Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
  • Marie-Anne Schelstraete
    Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
  • Michel Hupet
    Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
  • Contact author: Christelle Maillart, PhD, Unité Cognition & Développement, Faculté de Psychologie et des Sciences de l’Education, 10, Place Cardinal Mercier, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. E-mail: christelle.maillart@psp.ucl.ac.be
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2004
Phonological Representations in Children With SLI
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 187-198. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/016)
History: Received February 11, 2003 , Accepted May 22, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 187-198. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/016)
History: Received February 11, 2003; Accepted May 22, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 32

The present research examined the quality of the phonological representations of French children with specific language impairment (SLI) and those with normal language development (NLD). Twenty-five children with SLI and 50 children with NLD matched on lexical age level participated in an auditory lexical decision task. The observations gathered in our study can be summarized as follows. First, children with a higher receptive lexical level performed better, and this was true both for children with NLD and children with SLI. Second, both children with NLD and those with SLI were more likely to reject pseudowords resulting from a modification affecting the number of syllables of a word than pseudowords resulting from a slight modification with the number of syllables unchanged. This difference, however, was greater for the children with SLI, who appeared to have much difficulty rejecting pseudowords resulting from slight modifications. Finally, the performance of children with SLI was particularly poor when presented with pseudowords resulting from a slight modification at the beginning or the end of a word. These findings are interpreted as supporting the hypothesis of an underspecification of phonological representations in children with SLI.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique. We thank all the children who participated in the study and the speech therapist of the language class for their support, as well Elsa Coron and Stéphanie Vos for their assistance in data collection.
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