Gesture Development A Review for Clinical and Research Practices Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2004
Gesture Development
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nina C. Capone
    Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, and Children’s Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL
  • Karla K. McGregor
    Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
  • Contact author: Nina C. Capone, PhD, New York Medical College, Speech-Language Pathology Program, School of Public Health, Room 213, Valhalla, NY 10595. E-mail: nina_capone@nymc.edu
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2004
Gesture Development
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 173-186. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/015)
History: Received September 11, 2002 , Accepted May 22, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 173-186. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/015)
History: Received September 11, 2002; Accepted May 22, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 81

The aim of this article is to provide clinicians and researchers a comprehensive overview of the development and functions of gesture in childhood and in select populations with developmental language impairments. Of significance is the growing body of evidence that gesture enhances, not hinders, language development. In both normal and impaired populations, gesture and language development parallel each other and share underlying symbolic abilities. Gesture serves several functions, including those of communication, compensation, and transition to spoken language. In clinical practice, gesture may play a valuable role in diagnosis, prognosis, goal selection, and intervention for children with language impairments. Where available, supporting evidence is presented. Needs for additional research on gesture are also highlighted.

Acknowledgments
Some of the information in this article appears in a dissertation by the first author. We wish to thank Denise Bloom, Julie Cole, Barbara Nathanson, Robyn Newman, and Renee Reilly for their comments on an early version of this article. During the preparation of this article, the first author was supported by a dissertation year fellowship. We gratefully acknowledge the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (Award no. R29 DC 03698) for support of the second author during preparation of this article.
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