Social Difficulties and Victimization in Children With SLI at 11 Years of Age Specific language impairment is sometimes thought to be associated with concurrent difficulties in the area of social and behavioral development (N. Botting & G. Conti-Ramsden, 2000; D. P. Cantwell & L. Baker, 1987; M. Fujiki, B. Brinton, & C. Todd, 1996; S. Redmond & M. Rice, 1998). The present study ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2004
Social Difficulties and Victimization in Children With SLI at 11 Years of Age
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gina Conti-Ramsden
    University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Nicola Botting
    University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Contact author: Gina Conti-Ramsden, PhD, Human Communication and Deafness, School of Education, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL United Kingdom. E-mail: gina.conti-ramsden@man.ac.uk
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2004
Social Difficulties and Victimization in Children With SLI at 11 Years of Age
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 145-161. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/013)
History: Received April 30, 2002 , Accepted May 14, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 145-161. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/013)
History: Received April 30, 2002; Accepted May 14, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 128

Specific language impairment is sometimes thought to be associated with concurrent difficulties in the area of social and behavioral development (N. Botting & G. Conti-Ramsden, 2000; D. P. Cantwell & L. Baker, 1987; M. Fujiki, B. Brinton, & C. Todd, 1996; S. Redmond & M. Rice, 1998). The present study follows a group of 242 children, initially studied at age 7 years when they attended language units in England, and assesses their social and behavioral status at age 11 years.

In total, 64% of the children were found to have scores on the Rutter behavioral questionnaire (M. Rutter, 1967) of 9 or above (clinical threshold); 34% scored over the threshold for the Strengths and Difficulties questionnaire (R. Goodman, 1997); and 39% scored below average on the Peer Competence subscale of the Harter Perceived Competence Scale (S. Harter & R. Pike, 1984). On further analysis, these generalized difficulties were characterized mainly by poor social competence. In addition, 36% of the cohort were at risk of being regular targets for victimization compared to 12% of a comparison sample of typically developing peers.

Few associations were found between social outcome and other measures, including nonverbal intelligence, overall linguistic skill, gender, and longitudinal measures taken previously. Importantly, however, pragmatic language difficulties measured on the Children's Communication Checklist (D. V. M. Bishop, 1998) were most strongly related to poor social outcome and to expressive language related to victimization.

Acknowledgments
The authors gratefully acknowledge the Nuffield Foundation (grant DIR/28) for their continued financial support and also the Wellcome Trust (grant 060774) and the Economic and Social Research Council for a postdoctoral fellowship to the second author (RES-000-270-003). Thanks also to Zoë Simkin and Emma Knox for their help with the data collection. The authors would also like to thank the schools and families who helped us with this research.
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