Developmental Effects in the Masking-Level Difference Adults and children (aged 5 years 1 month to 10 years 8 months) were tested in a masking-level difference (MLD) paradigm in which detection of brief signals was contrasted for signal placement in masker envelope maxima versus masker envelope minima. Maskers were 50-Hz-wide noise bands centered on 500 Hz, and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2004
Developmental Effects in the Masking-Level Difference
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph W. Hall
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Emily Buss
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • John H. Grose
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Madhu B. Dev
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Contact author: Joseph W. Hall, PhD, Department of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599. E-mail: jwh@med.unc.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2004
Developmental Effects in the Masking-Level Difference
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 13-20. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/002)
History: Received February 10, 2003 , Accepted June 3, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 13-20. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/002)
History: Received February 10, 2003; Accepted June 3, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

Adults and children (aged 5 years 1 month to 10 years 8 months) were tested in a masking-level difference (MLD) paradigm in which detection of brief signals was contrasted for signal placement in masker envelope maxima versus masker envelope minima. Maskers were 50-Hz-wide noise bands centered on 500 Hz, and the signals were So or Sπ 30-ms, 500-Hz tones. In agreement with previous studies, it was found that MLDs were greater for masker envelope minima placement than for masker envelope maxima placement. Across the age range of the children tested here, the binaural advantage associated with the masker envelope minima increased with the age of the child. One interpretation of the present results is that there is a developmental improvement in binaural temporal resolution over the age range tested here.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01 DC00397.
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