Verbal and Spatial Information Processing Constraints in Children With Specific Language Impairment A dual-processing paradigm was used to investigate information processing limitations underlying specific language impairment (SLI). School-age children with and without SLI were asked to recall verbal and spatial stimuli in situations that varied the number of tasks that were required and the speed at which stimuli were presented. Children recalled ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2004
Verbal and Spatial Information Processing Constraints in Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • LaVae M. Hoffman
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Ronald B. Gillam
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Contact author: Lavae M. Hoffman, PhD, The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Jesse H. Jones Center for Communication, CMA 7.214, Austin, TX 78712. e-mail: lavae@mail.utexas.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2004
Verbal and Spatial Information Processing Constraints in Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 114-125. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/011)
History: Received October 23, 2002 , Accepted April 21, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2004, Vol. 47, 114-125. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2004/011)
History: Received October 23, 2002; Accepted April 21, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 88

A dual-processing paradigm was used to investigate information processing limitations underlying specific language impairment (SLI). School-age children with and without SLI were asked to recall verbal and spatial stimuli in situations that varied the number of tasks that were required and the speed at which stimuli were presented. Children recalled digits or locations of X's that were presented on a computer screen. In some conditions, they were asked to name or point to the color of the stimuli before completing the recall task. In comparison to their typically developing peers, children with SLI had generally poorer recall of digits and locations across all conditions. Typically developing children derived greater benefit than the children with SLI under conditions that enabled them to disperse processing efforts across verbal and spatial response modalities. It appears that limitations in general cognitive capacity and central executive functions in working memory work synergistically with response modality to constrain information processing in children with SLI.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access