Risk for Speech Disorder Associated With Early Recurrent Otitis Media With Effusion Two Retrospective Studies Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2000
Risk for Speech Disorder Associated With Early Recurrent Otitis Media With Effusion
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Peter Flipsen, Jr
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Helen Thielke
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Joan Kwiatkowski
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Marilyn K. Kertoy
    University of Western Ontario London, Ontario, Canada
  • Murray L. Katcher
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Robert A. Nellis
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Michael G. Block
    Starkey Laboratories, Inc. Eden Prairie, MN
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2000
Risk for Speech Disorder Associated With Early Recurrent Otitis Media With Effusion
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2000, Vol. 43, 79-99. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4301.79
History: Received March 3, 1998 , Accepted July 22, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2000, Vol. 43, 79-99. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4301.79
History: Received March 3, 1998; Accepted July 22, 1999

The goals of this two-part series on children with histories of early recurrent otitis media with effusion (OME) were to assess the risk for speech disorder with and without hearing loss and to develop a preliminary descriptive-explanatory model for the findings. Recently available speech analysis programs, lifespan reference data, and statistical techniques were implemented with three cohorts of children with OME and their controls originally assessed in the 1980s: 35 typically developing 3-year-old children followed since infancy in a university-affiliated pediatrics clinic, 50 typically developing children of Native American background followed since infancy in a tribal health clinic, and (in the second paper) 70 children followed prospectively from 2 months of age to 3 years of age and older. Dependent variables included information from a suite of 10 metrics of speech production (Shriberg, Austin, Lewis, McSweeny, & Wilson, 1997a, 1997b) . Constraints on available sociodemographic and hearing status information limit generalizations from the comparative findings for each database, particularly data from the two retrospective studies. The present paper reports findings from risk analysis of conversational speech data from the first two cohorts, each of which included retrospective study of children for whom data on hearing loss were not available. Early recurrent OME was not associated with increased risk for speech disorder in the pediatrics sample but was associated with approximately 4.6 (CI=1.10–20.20) increased risk for subclinical or clinical speech disorder in the children of Native American background. Discussion underscores the appropriateness of multifactorial risk models for this subtype of child speech disorder.

Acknowledgments
Preparation of this report was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health (DC00496). Many people contributed their time and expertise to these studies. We extend our sincere thanks to Chad Allen, Diane Austin, Delores Boyd, Betty Bricco, Carol Dodge, James Goinz, Frederic Gruber, Rebecca Hinke, Barbara Hodson, Kit Hoffmann, Patricia Engebose Hovel, Maureen McGowan Jepsen, Peter Karofsky, Roger Klumb, Gregory Lof, Jane McSweeny, Amparo Ortez, Mary Matz, Mary Jo Osberger, Elaine Paden, Mary Beth Pecore, Carmen Rasmussen, Dorothy Rorick Ross, Anne Smith, Geralyn Timmer,
Catherine Trost-Steffen, Sandy Wallin, Jerry Waukau, Cindy Weisflock, Audrey Weston, Carol Widder, Terry Wiley, and David Wilson. We also thank the editor, associate editor, and four reviewers for their extremely valuable editorial critique. Copies of relevant technical reports are available at the Phonology Project web site: from http:// www.waisman.wisc.edu/phonology/.
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