Cross-Modal Generalization Effects of Training Noncanonical Sentence Comprehension and Production in Agrammatic Aphasia The cross-modal generalization effects of training complex sentence comprehension and complex sentence production were examined in 4 individuals with agrammatic Broca’s aphasia who showed difficulty comprehending and producing complex, noncanonical sentences. Object-cleft and passive sentences were selected for treatment because the two are linguistically distinct, relying on wh- and NP ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2000
Cross-Modal Generalization Effects of Training Noncanonical Sentence Comprehension and Production in Agrammatic Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Beverly J. Jacobs
    Department of Communication Disorders The Florida State University Tallahassee
  • Cynthia K. Thompson
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders Department of Neurology and the Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: bjacobs@mailer.fsu.edu
  • Contact author: Beverly J. Jacobs, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, The Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306–1200. Email: bjacobs@mailer.fsu.edu
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2000
Cross-Modal Generalization Effects of Training Noncanonical Sentence Comprehension and Production in Agrammatic Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2000, Vol. 43, 5-20. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4301.05
History: Received October 19, 1998 , Accepted June 8, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2000, Vol. 43, 5-20. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4301.05
History: Received October 19, 1998; Accepted June 8, 1999

The cross-modal generalization effects of training complex sentence comprehension and complex sentence production were examined in 4 individuals with agrammatic Broca’s aphasia who showed difficulty comprehending and producing complex, noncanonical sentences. Object-cleft and passive sentences were selected for treatment because the two are linguistically distinct, relying on wh- and NP movement, respectively (Chomsky, 1986). Two participants received comprehension training, and 2 received production training using linguistic specific treatment (LST). LST takes participants through a series of steps that emphasize the verb and verb argument structure, as well as the linguistic movement required to derive target sentences. A single-subject multiple-baseline design across behaviors was used to measure acquisition and generalization within and across sentence types, as well as cross-modal generalization (i.e., from comprehension to production and vice versa) and generalization to discourse. Results indicated that both treatment methods were effective for training comprehension and production of target sentences and that comprehension treatment resulted in generalization to spoken and written sentence production. Sentence production treatment generalized to written sentence production only; generalization to comprehension did not occur. Across sentence types generalization also did not occur, as predicted, and the effects of treatment on discourse were inconsistent across participants. These data are discussed with regard to models of normal sentence comprehension and production.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to extend their appreciation to Andrea Bloom, Dr. Sandra Schneider, and Dr. Kirrie Ballard for their assistance with data collection and analysis. We also wish to thank the individuals with aphasia and their family members for their participation in this research and Dr. Shari Baum and three anonymous reviewers for their helpful suggestions. The National Institute of Health Grant R01DC01948 (C. K. Thompson) supported this research.
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