The Physiologic Development of Speech Motor Control Lip and Jaw Coordination Research Article
EDITOR'S AWARD
Research Article  |   February 01, 2000
The Physiologic Development of Speech Motor Control
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jordan R. Green
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of Washington Seattle
  • Christopher A. Moore
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of Washington Seattle
  • Masahiko Higashikawa
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of Washington Seattle
  • Roger W. Steeve
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of Washington Seattle
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: jordangreen@facstaff.wisc.edu
  • Currently affiliated with the University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Currently affiliated with the University of Wisconsin-Madison×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2000
The Physiologic Development of Speech Motor Control
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2000, Vol. 43, 239-255. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4301.239
History: Received November 11, 1998 , Accepted July 13, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2000, Vol. 43, 239-255. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4301.239
History: Received November 11, 1998; Accepted July 13, 1999

This investigation was designed to describe the development of lip and jaw coordination during speech and to evaluate the potential influence of speech motor development on phonologic development. Productions of syllables containing bilabial consonants were observed from speakers in four age groups (i.e., 1-year-olds, 2-year-olds, 6-year-olds, and young adults). A video-based movement tracking system was used to transduce movement of the upper lip, lower lip, and jaw. The coordinative organization of these articulatory gestures was shown to change dramatically during the first several years of life and to continue to undergo refinement past age 6. The present results are consistent with three primary phases in the development of lip and jaw coordination for speech: integration, differentiation, and refinement. Each of these developmental processes entails the existence of distinct coordinative constraints on early articulatory movement. It is suggested that these constraints will have predictable consequences for the sequence of phonologic development.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a research grant (R01 DC00822) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and NRSA Research Grant in Speech and Hearing Sciences T32 DC00033. The authors would like to acknowledge Dr. Fred Minifie, Dr. Carol Stoel-Gammon, and Dr. Susan Herring for their comments on early drafts of this manuscript and Becca Culver and Nicole Engel for their assistance with data collection and analysis.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access