Adults’ Perception and Production of the English Vowel /i/ This study investigated the link between the perception and production of the English vowel /i/ by adult native speakers of English. Participants first produced the vowel /i/ using normal (citation) and careful (hyperarticulated) speech, then completed a method of adjustment task in which they selected their ideal exemplar of /i/. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2000
Adults’ Perception and Production of the English Vowel /i/
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elaina M. Frieda
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Amanda C. Walley
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • James E. Flege
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Michael E. Sloane
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: awalley@uab.edu
  • Contact author: Amanda C. Walley, PhD, Department of Psychology, 415 Campbell Hall, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294. Email: awalley@uab.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2000
Adults’ Perception and Production of the English Vowel /i/
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2000, Vol. 43, 129-143. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4301.129
History: Received October 12, 1998 , Accepted June 2, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2000, Vol. 43, 129-143. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4301.129
History: Received October 12, 1998; Accepted June 2, 1999

This study investigated the link between the perception and production of the English vowel /i/ by adult native speakers of English. Participants first produced the vowel /i/ using normal (citation) and careful (hyperarticulated) speech, then completed a method of adjustment task in which they selected their ideal exemplar of /i/. In this perceptual task, 24 of 35 participants had a prototype; the remaining 11 did not, but were retained for comparison. In keeping with the hyperspace effect (K. Johnson, E. Flemming, & R. Wright, 1993), all participants selected perceptual stimuli with F1 and F2 values that were more extreme (i.e., higher and further forward in the vowel space) than those of their normal, citation productions. An analysis of front-back and high-low qualities for the perceptual and production data in Euclidian space revealed that hyperarticulated speech was closer to the perceptual data than citation speech was, but only for participants with relatively clear-cut prototypes. The basis for such individual variation in perception-production links is discussed.

Acknowledgments
Support for the research reported here was provided by the National Institute for Child Health and Development (HD30398) and the National Institute for Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (DC00257). We thank David Basilico and Fred Biasini for helpful suggestions regarding this work and Jamie Tyler for assistance with figure preparation. Two anonymous reviewers, as well as Sandra Gordon-Salant and Christopher Turner, made helpful comments on a previous version of this paper.
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