Interpreting Differences in Stuttering Frequency on Content and Function Words A Reply to Wingate (2003) Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   December 01, 2003
Interpreting Differences in Stuttering Frequency on Content and Function Words
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vikram N. Dayalu
    East Carolina University Greenville, NC
  • Joseph Kalinowski
    East Carolina University Greenville, NC
  • Andrew Stuart
    East Carolina University Greenville, NC
  • Contact author: Vikram N. Dayalu, MS, Stuttering Research Lab, Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University, Belk Annex, Oglesby Drive, Greenville, NC 27858. E-mail: vnd0729@mail.ecu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   December 01, 2003
Interpreting Differences in Stuttering Frequency on Content and Function Words
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2003, Vol. 46, 1471-1472. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/115)
History: Received May 20, 2003 , Accepted August 7, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2003, Vol. 46, 1471-1472. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/115)
History: Received May 20, 2003; Accepted August 7, 2003
In a Letter to the Editor, Wingate (2003)  attempted to suggest two “faults” with the article by Dayalu, Kalinowski, Stuart, Holbert, and Rastatter in the October 2002 issue of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. First, he noted one point pertaining to our post hoc interpretation of Brown’s (1937)  findings and remarked that “one cannot legitimately make such a claim on the basis of a post hoc reference to data reported by Brown” (Wingate, 2003, p. 1469). We accept Dr. Wingate’s point that Brown did not make the distinction between content and function words. The fact remains that during the past 35 years, other researchers (including Wingate) following Brown’s eight different grammatical distinctions have conveniently classified words into content and function categories. This includes data collected from both spontaneous speech and reading tasks (e.g., Au-Yeung, Howell, & Pilgrim, 1998; Bloodstein & Gantwerk, 1967; Bloodstein & Grossman, 1981; Griggs & Still, 1979; Howell & Au-Yeung, 2002; Howell, Au-Yeung, & Sackin, 1999, 2000; Jayaram, 1981; Koopmans, Slis, & Rietveld, 1991; Soderberg, 1967; Taylor, 1966; Wingate, 1967, 1979). In fact, Wingate himself remarked that “Brown (1937), Eisenson and Horowitz (1945), Hahn (1942), and Quarrington, Conway, and Siegel (1962)  have reported notable differences in frequency of stuttering among content words (in addition to marked differences between content and function words) during the reading of connected prose material” (Wingate, 1967, p. 151). Our question to Wingate is: “Why now?”
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