Phonological Priming in Picture Naming of Young Children Who Stutter The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of phonological priming on the speech reaction time (SRT) of children who do (CWS) and who do not (CWNS) stutter during a picture-naming task. Participants were eighteen 3–5-year-old CWS (M= 50.67 months, SD= 11.83 months), matched in age and gender ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2003
Phonological Priming in Picture Naming of Young Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenneth S. Melnick
    University of North Texas, Denton, TX
  • Edward G. Conture
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Ralph N. Ohde
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Contact author: Kenneth S. Melnick, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of North Texas, P.O. Box 305010, Denton, TX 76203-5010. E-mail: kmelnick@unt.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2003
Phonological Priming in Picture Naming of Young Children Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2003, Vol. 46, 1428-1443. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/111)
History: Received October 28, 2002 , Accepted May 12, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2003, Vol. 46, 1428-1443. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/111)
History: Received October 28, 2002; Accepted May 12, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 49

The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of phonological priming on the speech reaction time (SRT) of children who do (CWS) and who do not (CWNS) stutter during a picture-naming task. Participants were eighteen 3–5-year-old CWS (M= 50.67 months, SD= 11.83 months), matched in age and gender with 18 CWNS (M= 49.44 months, SD= 10.22 months). The picture-naming task required each child to name, one at a time, computer-presented, white-on-black line drawings of common, age-appropriate objects "as quickly as you can" during 3 different conditions: (a) no prime, (b) related prime, and (c) unrelated prime, with naming latency (alternatively referred to as SRT; in milliseconds) as the main dependent variable. Results indicated that all children exhibited faster or shorter SRTs during the related condition compared to the no prime condition. Similarly, SRT was influenced with advancing age for all children, with 5-year-olds exhibiting faster SRTs than 3-year-olds. Furthermore, CWNS, but not CWS, demonstrated a negative correlation between articulatory mastery and SRT. Findings were taken to suggest that phonological priming is a feasible procedure for studying the speech-language planning and production of 3–5-year-old children and that preschool children who stutter, as a group, may have somewhat less well developed articulatory systems than preschool children who do not stutter.

Acknowledgments
This research was completed as part of the first author’s doctoral dissertation and was supported, in part, by National Institutes of Health Grant DC00523 to Vanderbilt University. We would like to thank Mark Pellowski for his help with interjudge reliability measures and Daniel Ashmead, Timothy McNamara, and Terry Wertz for advice on and/or reviews of previous drafts. We would like to particularly thank Herman Kolk for his early encouragement, guidance, and support to pursue this line of investigation. In addition, we also express our appreciation to Warren Lambert for his help with statistical analysis. Finally, we are very much in debt as well as grateful to the parents and children who participated in this study.
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