Responses to Targets in the Visual Periphery in Deaf and Normal-Hearing Adults The purpose of this study was to compare the response times of deaf and normal-hearing individuals to the onset of target events in the visual periphery in distracting and nondistracting conditions. Visual reaction times to peripheral targets placed at 3 eccentricities to the left and right of a center fixation ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2003
Responses to Targets in the Visual Periphery in Deaf and Normal-Hearing Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ann M. Rothpletz
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Daniel H. Ashmead
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Anne Marie Tharpe
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Contact author: Ann M. Rothpletz, PhD, Department of Speech/Language and Hearing Sciences, Campus Box 409, Boulder, CO 80309-0409. E-mail: ann.rothpletz@colorado.edu
  • Currently affiliated with The University of Colorado at Boulder
    Currently affiliated with The University of Colorado at Boulder×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2003
Responses to Targets in the Visual Periphery in Deaf and Normal-Hearing Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2003, Vol. 46, 1378-1386. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/107)
History: Received February 18, 2003 , Accepted May 12, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2003, Vol. 46, 1378-1386. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/107)
History: Received February 18, 2003; Accepted May 12, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

The purpose of this study was to compare the response times of deaf and normal-hearing individuals to the onset of target events in the visual periphery in distracting and nondistracting conditions. Visual reaction times to peripheral targets placed at 3 eccentricities to the left and right of a center fixation point were measured in prelingually deafened adults and normal-hearing adults. Deaf participants responded more slowly than normal-hearing participants to targets in the near periphery in the nondistracting condition and to targets in the near and distant periphery when distracting stimuli were present. One interpretation of these findings is that deaf individuals may be more deliberate than normal-hearing individuals in responding to near peripheral events and to peripheral events that occur in the presence of distracting stimuli.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to express great appreciation to Robert Wall for his assistance in the construction and setup of the experimental hardware and to Fred Bess and John Rieser for their contributions throughout this project. Sincere appreciation is due the volunteers who participated in this project.
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