A Comparison of Language Abilities in Adolescents With Down Syndrome and Children With Specific Language Impairment This article compared the language profiles of adolescents with Down syndrome (DS) and children with specific language impairment matched for nonverbal cognitive ability, and investigated whether similar relationships could be established between language measures and other capacities in both groups. Language profiles were very similar: Expressive language was more affected ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2003
A Comparison of Language Abilities in Adolescents With Down Syndrome and Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Glynis Laws
    University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K.
  • Dorothy V. M. Bishop
    University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K.
  • Contact author: Glynis Laws, PhD, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3UD, United Kingdom. E-mail: glynis.laws@psy.ox.ac.uk
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2003
A Comparison of Language Abilities in Adolescents With Down Syndrome and Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2003, Vol. 46, 1324-1339. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/103)
History: Received November 15, 2002 , Accepted May 20, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2003, Vol. 46, 1324-1339. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/103)
History: Received November 15, 2002; Accepted May 20, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 113

This article compared the language profiles of adolescents with Down syndrome (DS) and children with specific language impairment matched for nonverbal cognitive ability, and investigated whether similar relationships could be established between language measures and other capacities in both groups. Language profiles were very similar: Expressive language was more affected than language comprehension, and grammar was more affected than vocabulary in both domains. Both groups were impaired on tests of grammatical morphology and phonological memory. There were some differences between the groups, but these could be attributed to other features of development of people with DS.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded by a Wellcome Trust grant to Dorothy Bishop. We would like to thank staff and pupils who took part in the study for their invaluable assistance, Deborah Gunn for contributing to the assessments of the adolescents with Down syndrome and controls, and Malcolm Proudfoot for MLU calculations.
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