Treatment Efficacy Cognitive-Communicative Disorders Resulting From Traumatic Brain Injury in Adults Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   October 01, 1996
Treatment Efficacy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carl A. Coelho
    Southern Connecticut State University New Haven
  • Frank DeRuyter
    Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC
  • Margo Stein
    Health Care Consultant St. Louis, MO
  • Contact author: Carl A. Coelho, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515-1355. Email: coelho_c@scsu.ctstateu.edu
  • Currently affiliated with the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
    Currently affiliated with the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Supplement: Treatment Efficacy, Part I
Supplement Article   |   October 01, 1996
Treatment Efficacy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, S5-S17. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.s5
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, S5-S17. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.s5

Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) may result in a broad array of cognitive-communicative impairments. Cognitive-communicative impairments are the result of deficits in linguistic and nonlinguistic cognitive functions. The speech-language pathologist functions as a member of the multidisciplinary team of professionals that collaboratively assess and treat individuals with TBI. The role of the speech-language pathologist includes assessment of all aspects of communication, as well as the communicative implications of cognitive deficits, and swallowing; treatment planning and programming, as determined by the individual's stage of recovery; client and family training/counseling; and interdisciplinary consultation. The effectiveness of speech and language intervention for specific cognitive deficits (e.g., attention, memory, executive functions) as well as general issues of social-skills training and early intervention are illustrated by scientific and clinical evidence from group-treatment and single-subject studies as well as case studies.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank those individuals who provided feedback on the initial draft of this article: Brenda L. B. Adamovich, Roberta DePompei, Danese Malkmus, McKay Moore Sohlberg, and (in particular) Mark Ylvisaker for his extensive comments. Cynthia Thompson and two anonymous reviewers provided several excellent suggestions for revising an earlier version of this article.
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