Treatment Efficacy Aphasia Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   October 1996
Treatment Efficacy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Audrey L. Holland
    University of Arizona Tucson
  • Davida S. Fromm
    University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA
  • Frank DeRuyter
    Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC
  • Margo Stein
    Health Care Consultant St. Louis, MO
  • Currently affiliated with the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
    Currently affiliated with the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association×
  • Contact author: Audrey L. Holland, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Building 171, Tucson, AZ 85721
    Contact author: Audrey L. Holland, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Building 171, Tucson, AZ 85721×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Supplement: Treatment Efficacy, Part I
Supplement Article   |   October 1996
Treatment Efficacy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, S27-S36. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.s27
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, S27-S36. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.s27

This article presents a brief overview of aphasia, followed by a summary of research studies and program evaluation data addressed to answering the question of the efficacy of treatment for aphasia. Selected studies are reviewed in terms of the quality of evidence they present. In addition, a number of questions that remain unanswered are also presented. Several tables, designed to provide clarifying information concerning several aspects of research design (number and types of patients studied, examples of well-designed small-group or single-subject studies, clinical techniques for which efficacy data are available), are included. The conclusion of this review is that, generally, treatment for aphasia is efficacious.

Acknowledgments
Preparation of this manuscript was made possible in part by a research grant from NIH/ NIDCD (DC 0149-03) to the University of Arizona. The authors wish to acknowledge the very generous help and editing of earlier drafts of this manuscript furnished by Paul Rao, Susan Smith, and, in particular, Robert T. Wertz, Cynthia K. Thompson, and Carol Frattali.
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