Treatment Efficacy Stuttering Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   October 01, 1996
Treatment Efficacy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edward G. Conture
    Syracuse University Syracuse, NY
  • Contact author: Edward G. Conture, PhD, Communication Sciences & Disorders, Syracuse University, 805 South Crouse Avenue, Syracuse, NY 13244-2280. Email: econture@sued.syr.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Supplement: Treatment Efficacy, Part I
Supplement Article   |   October 01, 1996
Treatment Efficacy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, S18-S26. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.s18
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, S18-S26. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.s18

The purpose of this article is to review the state of the art regarding treatment efficacy for stuttering in children, teenagers, and adults. Available evidence makes it apparent that individuals who stutter benefit from the services of speech-language pathologists, but it is also apparent that determining the outcome of stuttering treatment is neither easy nor simple. Whereas considerable research has documented the positive influence of tratment on stuttering frequency and behavior, far less attention has been paid to the effects of treatment on the daily life activities of people who stutter and their families. Although it seems reasonable to assume that ameliorating the disability of stuttering lessens the handicap of stuttering, considerably more evidence is needed to confirm this assumption. Despite such concerns, it also seems reasonable to suggest that the outcomes of treatment for many people who stutter are positive and should become increasingly so with advances in applied as well as basic research.

Acknowledgments
Preparation of this paper was made possible in part by a research grant from NIH/ NIDCD (DC000523) to Syracuse University. The author would like to thank Collette Fay and Colleen Halstead for their assistance with manuscript preparation and case study development.
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