Phonological Characteristics of Children Whose Stuttering Persisted or Recovered Among children who stutter, more will be identified with articulation/phonological deficiencies than among normally fluent children of the same ages. Most current literature has focused on phonological differences between those children who stutter and those who do not. The present study examines early phonological differences between young children whose stuttering ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1996
Phonological Characteristics of Children Whose Stuttering Persisted or Recovered
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elaine Pagel Paden
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Ehud Yairi
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Contact author: Elaine P. Paden, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois, 901 South Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820. E-mail: e-paden@uiuc.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1996
Phonological Characteristics of Children Whose Stuttering Persisted or Recovered
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, 981-990. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.981
History: Received October 20, 1995 , Accepted March 15, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, 981-990. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.981
History: Received October 20, 1995; Accepted March 15, 1996

Among children who stutter, more will be identified with articulation/phonological deficiencies than among normally fluent children of the same ages. Most current literature has focused on phonological differences between those children who stutter and those who do not. The present study examines early phonological differences between young children whose stuttering persisted and those who recovered from early stuttering. Thirty-six children, 12 whose stuttering persisted, 12 who recovered early, and 12 who recovered later, had been assessed by means of the Assessment of Phonological Processes—Revised (Hodson, 1986) soon after they were identified as exhibiting stuttering. After many months of longitudinal evaluation of their stuttering that led to their classification into the three groups, the early phonological assessments of these children were re-examined to identify differences. Overall mean percentage of error scores as well as error scores on specific phonological patterns showed that the persistent group differed significantly from normally fluent control subjects matched by age and sex. Scores of the two groups who recovered and their matched controls, however, did not differ significantly. Although poor phonological ability in the early stage of stuttering appears to be a contributing factor to the differentiation of persistence and recovery, the wide individual variations in scores within groups suggest that additional factors are necessary for reliable prediction.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by research grant number 5 ROI DC 00459-06 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health; principal investigator, Ehud Yairi. It was also supported by a grant from the Campus Research Board, University of Illinois at Urbana-Cham-paign. The generous assistance of Nicoline Ambrose and Rebecca Throneburg in the conduct and preparation of this study is greatly appreciated. Assistance in transcribing the subjects’ test responses was provided by Jamie Mahurin Smith, Jami Steinbeck Bossart, and Lorna Trower.
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