Evaluation of Auditory Enhancement and Auditory Suppression in Listeners With Normal Hearing and Reduced Speech Recognition in Noise A number of individuals complain of difficulties with speech recognition in noise in spite of normal hearing. This has prompted a search for disruptions in other areas of auditory processing that may account for these deficits. Two processes that may be related to speech recognition, auditory suppression and auditory enhancement, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1996
Evaluation of Auditory Enhancement and Auditory Suppression in Listeners With Normal Hearing and Reduced Speech Recognition in Noise
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda M. Thibodeau
    Department of Speech Communication Program in Communication Sciences and Disorders University of Texas Austin
  • Contact author: Linda M. Thibodeau, PhD, Callier Center for Communication Disorders, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75235. E-mail: thib@utdallas.edu
  • Currently affiliated with the Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas
    Currently affiliated with the Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1996
Evaluation of Auditory Enhancement and Auditory Suppression in Listeners With Normal Hearing and Reduced Speech Recognition in Noise
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, 947-956. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.947
History: Received October 15, 1995 , Accepted May 2, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, 947-956. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.947
History: Received October 15, 1995; Accepted May 2, 1996

A number of individuals complain of difficulties with speech recognition in noise in spite of normal hearing. This has prompted a search for disruptions in other areas of auditory processing that may account for these deficits. Two processes that may be related to speech recognition, auditory suppression and auditory enhancement, were evaluated in five listeners with normal speech recognition in noise (NSRN) and five listeners with reduced speech recognition in noise (RSRN). Although differences between the two groups were not observed for enhanced forward masking, significant differences were observed in two-tone suppression when the duration of the suppressor was varied. Those with RSRN showed greater suppression than those with NSRN when the suppressor onset preceded the masker onset.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by grants from the Deafness Research Foundation and research grant 5 R29 DC 00911-05 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health. Appreciation is expressed to Dianne Van Tasell for providing the speech stimuli and to Victor Bray for assistance in analyzing the speech reception data. Chris Turner, Jill Preminger, and one anonymous reviewer provided helpful comments on an earlier version of this manuscript.
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