Acoustic and Articulatory Measures of Sibilant Production With and Without Auditory Feedback From a Cochlear Implant The articulator positions of a subject with a cochlear implant were measured with an electromagnetic midsagittal articulometer (EMMA) system with and without auditory feedback available to the subject via his implant. Acoustic analysis of sibilant productions included specific measures of their spectral properties as well as the F3 formant amplitude. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1996
Acoustic and Articulatory Measures of Sibilant Production With and Without Auditory Feedback From a Cochlear Implant
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melanie L. Matthies
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Laboratory of Electronics Cambridge and Department of Communication Disorders Sargent College of Allied Health Professions Boston University
  • Mario Svirsky
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Laboratory of Electronics Cambridge
  • Joseph Perkell
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Laboratory of Electronics and Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences Cambridge
  • Harlan Lane
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Laboratory of Electronics Cambridge and Department of Otolaryngology Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School and Northeastern University Boston
  • Contact author: Melanie L. Matthies, PhD, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Email: melanie@speech.mit.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1996
Acoustic and Articulatory Measures of Sibilant Production With and Without Auditory Feedback From a Cochlear Implant
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, 936-946. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.936
History: Received July 5, 1995 , Accepted May 2, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, 936-946. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.936
History: Received July 5, 1995; Accepted May 2, 1996

The articulator positions of a subject with a cochlear implant were measured with an electromagnetic midsagittal articulometer (EMMA) system with and without auditory feedback available to the subject via his implant. Acoustic analysis of sibilant productions included specific measures of their spectral properties as well as the F3 formant amplitude. More general postural characteristics of the utterances, such as speech rate and sound level, were measured as well. Because of the mechanical and aerodynamic interdependence of the articulators, the postural variables must be considered before attributing speech improvement to the selective correction of a phonemic target with the use of auditory feedback. The tongue blade position was related to the shape and central tendency of the /∫/ spectra; however, changes in the spectral contrast between /s/ and /∫/ were not related to changes in the more general postural variables of rate and sound level. These findings suggest that the cochlear implant is providing this subject with important auditory cues that he can use to monitor his speech and maintain the phonemic contrast between /s/ and /∫/.

Acknowledgments
Mario Svirsky is currently at the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine.
We are grateful to the subject for his patience and cooperation and to Dr. Donald Eddington for his help in testing the implant with EMMA. We also thank Dr. William Rabinowitz, Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT for providing us with the CUNY and NU-6 results. This work was supported by an NIDCD grant to the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Northeastern University (Dr. Joseph B. Nadol and Dr. Donald Eddington, Co-Principal Investigators) and an NIDCD grant to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Dr. Joseph Perkell, Principal Investigator). We would also like to thank the two anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments.
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