Does Speech Emerge From Earlier Appearing Oral Motor Behaviors? This investigation was designed to quantify the coordinative organization of mandibular muscles in toddlers during speech and nonspeech behaviors. Seven 15-month-olds were observed during spontaneous production of chewing, sucking, babbling, and speech. Comparison of mandibular coordination across these behaviors revealed that, even for children in the earliest stages of true ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1996
Does Speech Emerge From Earlier Appearing Oral Motor Behaviors?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christopher A. Moore
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of Washington Seattle
  • Jacki L. Ruark
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology University of Tennessee Knoxville
  • Contact author: Christopher A. Moore, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, 1417 NE 42nd Street, Seattle, WA 98105–6246. Email: camoore @u.washington.edu
Article Information
Development / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1996
Does Speech Emerge From Earlier Appearing Oral Motor Behaviors?
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, 1034-1047. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.1034
History: Received January 10, 1996 , Accepted May 24, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 1996, Vol. 39, 1034-1047. doi:10.1044/jshr.3905.1034
History: Received January 10, 1996; Accepted May 24, 1996

This investigation was designed to quantify the coordinative organization of mandibular muscles in toddlers during speech and nonspeech behaviors. Seven 15-month-olds were observed during spontaneous production of chewing, sucking, babbling, and speech. Comparison of mandibular coordination across these behaviors revealed that, even for children in the earliest stages of true word production, coordination was quite different from that observed for other behaviors. Production of true words was predominantly characterized by relatively stronger coupling among all mandibular muscles compared with earlier-emerging chewing and sucking. Variegated babbling exhibited stronger coupling than reduplicated babbling, as well as chewing and sucking. The finding of coupled activation among mandibular antagonists during speech paralleled earlier comparisons of adult speech and nonspeech behaviors (Moore, Smith, & Ringel, 1988) and did not support the suggestion that speech coordination emerges from earlier appearing oral motor behaviors.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by research grant number 7R29DC00822 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, and from the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. Both authors are formerly of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Pittsburgh. They would like to acknowledge the valued contributions to this work by Tammy Jo Caulfield and Jordan Green.
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