Temperamental Characteristics of Young Children Who Stutter The purpose of this investigation was to assess the temperamental characteristics of children who do (CWS) and do not (CWNS) stutter using a norm-referenced parent-report questionnaire. Participants were 31 CWS and 31 CWNS between the ages of 3;0 (years;months) and 5;4 (CWS: mean age=48.03 months; CWNS: mean age=48.58 months). The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2003
Temperamental Characteristics of Young Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie D. Anderson
    Indiana University Bloomington
  • Mark W. Pellowski
    Towson University Towson, MD
  • Edward G. Conture
    Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN
  • Ellen M. Kelly
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Julie D. Anderson, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, 200 Jordan Avenue South, Bloomington, IN 47405-7002. E-mail: judander@indiana.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2003
Temperamental Characteristics of Young Children Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2003, Vol. 46, 1221-1233. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/095)
History: Received January 6, 2003 , Accepted March 4, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2003, Vol. 46, 1221-1233. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/095)
History: Received January 6, 2003; Accepted March 4, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 63

The purpose of this investigation was to assess the temperamental characteristics of children who do (CWS) and do not (CWNS) stutter using a norm-referenced parent-report questionnaire. Participants were 31 CWS and 31 CWNS between the ages of 3;0 (years;months) and 5;4 (CWS: mean age=48.03 months; CWNS: mean age=48.58 months). The CWS were matched by age (±4 months), gender, and race to the CWNS. All participants had speech, language, and hearing development within normal limits, with the obvious exception of stuttering for CWS. Children's temperamental characteristics were determined using the Behavioral Style Questionnaire (BSQ; S. C. McDevitt & W. B. Carey, 1978), which was completed by each child's parents. Results, based on parent responses to the BSQ, indicated that CWS are more apt, when compared to CWNS, to exhibit temperamental profiles consistent with hypervigilance (i.e., less distractibility), nonadaptability to change, and irregular biological functions. Findings suggest that some temperamental characteristics differentiate CWS from CWNS and could conceivably contribute to the exacerbation, as well as maintenance, of their stuttering.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported, in part, by National Institutes of Health Grant DC00523 to Vanderbilt University. We would like to thank the parents and children who participated in this study as well as Corrin Graham for her assistance with analysis of participant description data.
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