Respiratory and Laryngeal Responses to an Oral Air Pressure Bleed During Speech Researchers have hypothesized that the respiratory and laryngeal speech subsystems would respond to an air pressure bleed, but these responses have not been empirically studied. The present study examined the nature of the responses of the respiratory and laryngeal subsystems to an air pressure bleed in order to provide information ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2003
Respiratory and Laryngeal Responses to an Oral Air Pressure Bleed During Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica E. Huber
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Elaine T. Stathopoulos
    State University of New York at Buffalo Buffalo, NY
  • Contact author: Jessica E. Huber, PhD, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Purdue University, 500 Oval Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2038. E-mail: jhuber@purdue.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2003
Respiratory and Laryngeal Responses to an Oral Air Pressure Bleed During Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2003, Vol. 46, 1207-1220. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/094)
History: Received August 13, 2002 , Accepted February 25, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2003, Vol. 46, 1207-1220. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/094)
History: Received August 13, 2002; Accepted February 25, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

Researchers have hypothesized that the respiratory and laryngeal speech subsystems would respond to an air pressure bleed, but these responses have not been empirically studied. The present study examined the nature of the responses of the respiratory and laryngeal subsystems to an air pressure bleed in order to provide information relevant to the nature of motor control for speech. Participants produced a syllable train consisting of 7 syllables of [pα] 10 times with and without an air pressure bleed in place. Acoustic, aerodynamic, and respiratory kinematic data were collected. In the bleed condition, peak intraoral air pressure and average oral airflow during the [α] were lower, lung and rib cage volume excursions were longer, and rib cage volume terminations were more negative. This study provides empirical data demonstrating a clear interaction among the speech subsystems. Both active and passive mechanisms are suggested by the subsystems' responses.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank Joan E. Sussman, PhD; Kris Tjaden, PhD; Jeffrey Higginbotham, PhD; Anthony Duggan, MA; and Angela M. Haller, DDS for their assistance with this study.
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