The Effectiveness of Grammar Instruction for Individuals Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systems A Preliminary Study Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2003
The Effectiveness of Grammar Instruction for Individuals Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systems
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shelley K. Lund
    The Pennsylvania State University
  • Janice Light
    The Pennsylvania State University
  • Contact author: Shelley K. Lund, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201-0413. E-mail: sklund@uwm.edu
  • Shelley K. Lund is now at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
    Shelley K. Lund is now at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2003
The Effectiveness of Grammar Instruction for Individuals Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systems
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2003, Vol. 46, 1110-1123. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/087)
History: Received August 23, 2002 , Accepted March 25, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2003, Vol. 46, 1110-1123. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/087)
History: Received August 23, 2002; Accepted March 25, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

This study examined the effectiveness of an instructional program designed to teach grammar skills to individuals who communicated via augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). A single-subject, multiple probe across behaviors design was used to measure the effect of the instructional program on the acquisition and maintenance of the skills learned. Two adults with cerebral palsy participated in the study. The instructional program was used to teach 2 grammatical forms to each participant. Word order in adjective phrases and inversion of the auxiliary do in wh- questions was targeted for 1 participant; use of possessive pronouns and inclusion of to when using infinitives as modal verbs was targeted for the second participant. The instructional program was shown to be effective. Both participants learned to produce the grammatical forms taught. One participant maintained these skills for at least 2 months after the completion of instruction; the other participant required additional instruction in order to maintain the skills learned. Although based on a small sample, the results suggest that intervention can help individuals who use AAC improve their grammar skills. Limitations of the study are discussed, along with directions for future research.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this article were submitted by the first author in partial fulfillment of PhD requirements at The Pennsylvania State University Department of Communication Disorders. A preliminary version of this article was presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, San Francisco, in November 1999.
We would like to thank the individuals who use AAC who participated in the study for their hard work and dedication to the project. We are grateful to Brittany Larsson and Laura Pitkin for their assistance with data collection and to Lauren Loadenthal and Angie Canfield for their assistance with reliability.
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