Children’s Productions of the Affix -ed in Past Tense and Past Participle Contexts Children’s productions of the affix -ed in past tense and past participle contexts (e.g., the boy kicked the ball vs. the ball was kicked) were examined in spontaneous conversations and elicited productions. The performances of 7 children with specific language impairment (SLI) were compared with those of 2 control groups ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 2003
Children’s Productions of the Affix -ed in Past Tense and Past Participle Contexts
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sean M. Redmond
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Contact author: Sean M. Redmond, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Utah, 390 S. 1530 E. BEHS, Rm. 1201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0252. E-mail: sean.redmond@health.utah.edu
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 2003
Children’s Productions of the Affix -ed in Past Tense and Past Participle Contexts
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2003, Vol. 46, 1095-1109. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/086)
History: Received October 24, 2002 , Accepted March 18, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2003, Vol. 46, 1095-1109. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/086)
History: Received October 24, 2002; Accepted March 18, 2003

Children’s productions of the affix -ed in past tense and past participle contexts (e.g., the boy kicked the ball vs. the ball was kicked) were examined in spontaneous conversations and elicited productions. The performances of 7 children with specific language impairment (SLI) were compared with those of 2 control groups of typically developing children (age matches, MLU matches). Children with SLI produced fewer obligatory contexts for both past tense and past participle forms than did the control children, and were more likely to omit past tense affixes. In contrast, few omissions of the past participle were observed across all 3 groups. Implications for theories regarding the morphological deficits associated with SLI are discussed.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this study were presented at the November 2000 annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Washington, DC. This study was supported by an intramural development grant provided by the University of Utah. I am greatly indebted to the children and their families for their generosity. Appreciation is also extended to the program directors and speech-language pathologists from the Granite School District and the University of Utah Speech-Language-Hearing clinic and to the teachers and staff at the Professional Child Care and Learning Center and the Kindercare day care centers of Salt Lake City for their help locating potential participants. Several graduate and undergraduate students from the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Utah assisted in various aspects of the project and their significant contributions are acknowledged: Andrea Ash, Sarah Deimund, Jennifer Driggs, Alycia Jordison, Kristen Copeland, Carol Huitema, Monika Liebergesell, Elizabeth Nelson, Heather Nielsen, Joelle Rasmussen, and Jayne Shaum.
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