The University College London Archive of Stuttered Speech (UCLASS) Purpose This research note gives details of 2 releases of audio recordings available from speakers who stutter that can be accessed on the Web. Method Most of the recordings are from school-age children. These are available on the University College London Archive of Stuttered Speech (UCLASS) Web site, ... Research Note
Research Note  |   April 01, 2009
The University College London Archive of Stuttered Speech (UCLASS)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Peter Howell
    University College London
  • Stephen Davis
    University College London
  • Jon Bartrip
    University College London
  • Contact author: Peter Howell, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, England. E-mail: p.howell@ucl.ac.uk.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   April 01, 2009
The University College London Archive of Stuttered Speech (UCLASS)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2009, Vol. 52, 556-569. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0129)
History: Received June 15, 2007 , Accepted June 11, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2009, Vol. 52, 556-569. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0129)
History: Received June 15, 2007; Accepted June 11, 2008

Purpose This research note gives details of 2 releases of audio recordings available from speakers who stutter that can be accessed on the Web.

Method Most of the recordings are from school-age children. These are available on the University College London Archive of Stuttered Speech (UCLASS) Web site, and information is provided about how to access the site. A description of the recordings and background information about the speakers who contributed recordings to UCLASS Releases One and Two are given. The sample types available in Release One are monologs. Release Two has monologs, readings, and conversations. Three optional software formats that can be used with the archive are described (although processing the archive is not restricted to these formats). Some perceptual assessment of the quality of each recording is given. An assessment of the strengths and limitations of the recording archive is presented. Finally, some past applications and future research possibilities using the recordings are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Wellcome Trust Grant 072639 to the first author.
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