Influence of Text Type, Topic Familiarity, and Stuttering Frequency on Listener Recall, Comprehension, and Mental Effort Purpose To determine how text type, topic familiarity, and stuttering frequency influence listener recall, comprehension, and perceived mental effort. Method Sixty adults listened to familiar and unfamiliar narrative and expository texts produced with 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% stuttering. Participants listened to 4 experimental text samples at only ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2009
Influence of Text Type, Topic Familiarity, and Stuttering Frequency on Listener Recall, Comprehension, and Mental Effort
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James Panico
    Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville
  • E. Charles Healey
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Contact author: James Panico, 1101 Founders Hall, Box 1147, Edwardsville, IL 62026. E-mail: jpanico@siue.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2009
Influence of Text Type, Topic Familiarity, and Stuttering Frequency on Listener Recall, Comprehension, and Mental Effort
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2009, Vol. 52, 534-546. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0238)
History: Received October 25, 2007 , Revised May 7, 2008 , Accepted July 15, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2009, Vol. 52, 534-546. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0238)
History: Received October 25, 2007; Revised May 7, 2008; Accepted July 15, 2008

Purpose To determine how text type, topic familiarity, and stuttering frequency influence listener recall, comprehension, and perceived mental effort.

Method Sixty adults listened to familiar and unfamiliar narrative and expository texts produced with 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% stuttering. Participants listened to 4 experimental text samples at only 1 stuttering frequency. After hearing the text samples, each listener performed a free recall task, answered cued recall questions, answered story comprehension questions, and rated their perceived mental effort.

Results Free and cued recall as well as story comprehension scores were higher for narrative than for expository texts. Free and cued recall scores were better for familiar than for unfamiliar stories, although topic familiarity did not affect story comprehension scores. Samples with all levels of stuttering resulted in higher mental effort ratings for both text types and topic familiarities.

Conclusions Stuttering has a greater influence on listener recall and comprehension for narrative than for expository texts. Topic familiarity affects free and cued recall but has no influence on story comprehension. Regardless of the amount of stuttering, mental effort was high for both text types and levels of familiarity.

Acknowledgment
Support for this research was provided by the Malcolm Fraser Foundation. This study is based on a doctoral dissertation completed by the first author while attending the University of Nebraska. The authors thank Tom Carrell, Dixie Sanger, and Christy Horn for their input on this study and David Evans for his assistance in preparing the stimuli for this study. Portions of this article were presented as a poster session at the November 2006 annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Miami Beach, FL.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access