Effect of Low-Frequency Gain Reduction on Speech Recognition and Its Relation to Upward Spread of Masking Speech recognition was measured in listeners with normal hearing and in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss under conditions that simulated hearing aid processing in a low-pass and speech-shaped background noise. Differing amounts of low-frequency gain reduction were applied during a high-frequency monosyllable test and a sentence level test to simulate ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1997
Effect of Low-Frequency Gain Reduction on Speech Recognition and Its Relation to Upward Spread of Masking
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jodi A. Cook
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science Arizona State University Tempe
  • Sid P. Bacon
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science Arizona State University Tempe
  • Carol A. Sammeth
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science Arizona State University Tempe
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: jodi.cook@asu.edu
  • Carol A. Sammeth is currently affiliated with Roudebush VA Medical Center and the Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis.
    Carol A. Sammeth is currently affiliated with Roudebush VA Medical Center and the Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1997
Effect of Low-Frequency Gain Reduction on Speech Recognition and Its Relation to Upward Spread of Masking
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1997, Vol. 40, 410-422. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4002.410
History: Received May 29, 1996 , Accepted November 6, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1997, Vol. 40, 410-422. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4002.410
History: Received May 29, 1996; Accepted November 6, 1996

Speech recognition was measured in listeners with normal hearing and in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss under conditions that simulated hearing aid processing in a low-pass and speech-shaped background noise. Differing amounts of low-frequency gain reduction were applied during a high-frequency monosyllable test and a sentence level test to simulate the frequency responses of some commercial hearing aids. The results showed an improvement in speech recognition with low-frequency gain reduction in the low-pass noise, but not in the speech-shaped background noise. Masking patterns also were obtained with the two background noises at 70 and 80 dB SPL to compare with the speech results. There was no correlation observed between the masking results and the improvement in speech recognition with low-frequency gain reduction.

Acknowledgments
A portion of these results was presented at the American Academy of Audiology Conference in Dallas, Texas, 1995. This research was partially funded by a grant from NIDCD (DC01376).
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