Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Frequency-Altered Auditory Feedback on the Speech of Adults Who Stutter A series of single-subject experiments evaluated the effects of frequency-altered auditory feedback (FAF) on the speech performance of four adult males who stutter. Using alterations of plus or minus one octave, FAF was compared with normal auditory feedback (NAF) in oral reading and spontaneous speech with measurements made of stuttered ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1997
Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Frequency-Altered Auditory Feedback on the Speech of Adults Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Richard A. Moglia
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Peter Frank
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Janis Costello Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Anne K. Cordes
    University of Georgia Athens
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1997
Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Frequency-Altered Auditory Feedback on the Speech of Adults Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1997, Vol. 40, 361-372. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4002.361
History: Received May 29, 1996 , Accepted September 12, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1997, Vol. 40, 361-372. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4002.361
History: Received May 29, 1996; Accepted September 12, 1996

A series of single-subject experiments evaluated the effects of frequency-altered auditory feedback (FAF) on the speech performance of four adult males who stutter. Using alterations of plus or minus one octave, FAF was compared with normal auditory feedback (NAF) in oral reading and spontaneous speech with measurements made of stuttered intervals, stutter-free speech rate, and speech naturalness. The effects of extended FAF conditions on spontaneous speech were also evaluated for two subjects who demonstrated a positive response to FAF. Results showed no consistencies across subjects in responses to FAF: One subject showed no response, another produced an initial temporary response, a third showed a deterioration in speech quality with minimal reductions in stuttering, and a fourth displayed substantial and sustained improvements in speech performance. Some implications of these findings for current research and theory about the relationship between stuttering and FAF are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by research grant number 5 RO1 DC 00060-05 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health. The authors express their appreciation to the following individuals who also made this study possible: Archi Gaebel and Chad Stokes, for their invaluable contributions to the collection and compilation of data in this study; Jeffrey Danhauer, for calibrating and testing the FAF equipment and providing hearing tests; and David Sangster, for preparing all figures. Special thanks are due to Jerry Siegel and David Prins for their supportive comments on this manuscript, and to Dick Curlee for his helpful editorializing.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access