Developmental Apraxia of Speech II. Toward a Diagnostic Marker Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1997
Developmental Apraxia of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Dorothy M. Aram
    Emerson College Boston, MA
  • Joan Kwiatkowski
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1997
Developmental Apraxia of Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1997, Vol. 40, 286-312. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4002.286
History: Received June 4, 1996 , Accepted October 13, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1997, Vol. 40, 286-312. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4002.286
History: Received June 4, 1996; Accepted October 13, 1996

This second paper in a series on developmental apraxia of speech (DAS) (Shriberg, Aram, & Kwiatkowski, 1997a) reports findings from two studies. Study I compares speech and prosody-voice profiles of a group of 14 children with suspected DAS to profiles of 73 children with speech delay (SD). Results suggest that the only linguistic domain that differentiates some children with suspected DAS from those with SD is inappropriate stress. Study II cross-validates these findings, using retrospective data from a sample of 20 children with suspected DAS evaluated in a university phonology clinic over a 10-year period. Discussion considers methodological and conceptual issues in the measurement of linguistic stress. Theoretical issues and implications for research and clinical practice are deferred for synthesis of the present findings with those from a multi-site crossvalidation project (Shriberg, Aram, & Kwiatkowski, 1997b).

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the U.S. Public Health Service, NIDCD DC00496. We express sincere thanks to the following people for their time and capable research assistance at different stages of this project: Barrie Babow, Mary Coberly, Barbara Ekelman, Frederic Gruber, Kit Hoffmann, Patricia Hovel, Maureen McGowan Jepsen, Gregory Lof, Jane McSweeny, Amparo Ortez, Dorothy Ross, Carmen Rasmussen, Carol Widder, and David Wilson. Special thanks to Diane Austin for her insightful assistance with all phases of the computational analyses and manuscript processing.
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