Developmental Apraxia of Speech I. Descriptive and Theoretical Perspectives Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1997
Developmental Apraxia of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Dorothy M. Aram
    Emerson College Boston, MA
  • Joan Kwiatkowski
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1997
Developmental Apraxia of Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1997, Vol. 40, 273-285. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4002.273
History: Received June 4, 1996 , Accepted October 13, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1997, Vol. 40, 273-285. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4002.273
History: Received June 4, 1996; Accepted October 13, 1996

Developmental apraxia of speech (DAS) is a putative diagnostic category for children whose speech errors presumedly (a) differ from the errors of children with developmental speech delay (SD) and (b) resemble the errors of adults with acquired apraxia of speech. The studies reported in this series (Shriberg, Aram, & Kwiatkowski, 1997a, 1997b) concern both premises, with primary focus on the first—that children with DAS can be differentiated from children with SD on the basis of one or more reliable differences in their speech error profiles. Immediate goals are to identify a diagnostic marker for DAS and to consider implications for research and clinical practice. A long-term goal is to identify the phenotype marker for DAS, on the assumption that it may be a genetically transmitted disorder. This first paper reviews relevant descriptive and theoretical perspectives. Findings from a local ascertainment study support the clinical functionality of the term suspected DAS.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institutes of Health (NIDCD) grants DC01948 and DC00494. The authors wish to extend their appreciation to the individuals with aphasia who participated in this research. We also wish to thank Beverly Wulfeck and two anonymous reviewers for their helpful suggestions.
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