Tutorial An Introduction to Syntax Tutorial
Tutorial  |   April 01, 1997
Tutorial
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lewis P. Shapiro
    Department of Communicative Disorders San Diego State University and Center for Human Information Processing University of California, San Diego
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: Shapiro@mail.sdsu.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   April 01, 1997
Tutorial
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1997, Vol. 40, 254-272. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4002.254
History: Received September 26, 1995 , Accepted September 30, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1997, Vol. 40, 254-272. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4002.254
History: Received September 26, 1995; Accepted September 30, 1996

This paper is intended as an introduction to syntax. Borrowing from Chomsky's Government & Binding and Principles & Parameters frameworks (Chomsky, 1986, 1992, 1995), various aspects of syntactic theory are described. These include lexical, functional, and phrasal categories and how they are put together into clauses and sentences, how words are represented in the mental lexicon, how lexical properties project to the syntax, and how noun phrases are assigned structural and semantic information. Additionally, how sentences that are not canonically ordered are derived and represented, how and to what do pronouns refer, and the principles that connect all these theoretical notions to form knowledge of language are described. The paper concludes with a summary of work in normal and disordered language, including treatment of language disorders, that has exploited aspects of the syntactic theory described in this paper.

Acknowledgments
I would like to acknowledge the support from NIH (NIDCD) grants DC00494 and DC01948. I would also like to thank Dr. Cynthia Thompson and two anonymous reviewers for their very helpful comments on an earlier draft of this paper.
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