Training and Generalized Production of wh- and NP-Movement Structures in Agrammatic Aphasia The present research examines production of "complex" sentences, which involve movement of noun phrases (NPs), in 2 agrammatic aphasic subjects. According to linguistic theory (Chomsky, 1991, 1993), such sentences are derived using one of two movement operations, either wh- or NP-movement, subsumed under the general rule "move alpha." In this ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1997
Training and Generalized Production of wh- and NP-Movement Structures in Agrammatic Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cynthia K. Thompson
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders Aphasia Research Laboratory and Department of Neurology and Center for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology and The Alzheimer's Program Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Lewis P. Shapiro
    Department of Communicative Disorders and Center for Human Information Processing University of California, San Diego
  • Kirrie J. Ballard
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders Aphasia Research Laboratory Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Beverly J. Jacobs
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders Aphasia Research Laboratory Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Sandra S. Schneider
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders Aphasia Research Laboratory Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Mary E. Tait
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders Aphasia Research Laboratory Northwestern University Evanston, IL
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1997
Training and Generalized Production of wh- and NP-Movement Structures in Agrammatic Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1997, Vol. 40, 228-244. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4002.228
History: Received September 15, 1995 , Accepted September 13, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1997, Vol. 40, 228-244. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4002.228
History: Received September 15, 1995; Accepted September 13, 1996

The present research examines production of "complex" sentences, which involve movement of noun phrases (NPs), in 2 agrammatic aphasic subjects. According to linguistic theory (Chomsky, 1991, 1993), such sentences are derived using one of two movement operations, either wh- or NP-movement, subsumed under the general rule "move alpha." In this experiment recovery of both wh- and NP-movement derived sentences was investigated using a treatment research paradigm. Subjects were sequentially trained to produce either wh-movement (i.e., who questions, object clefts) or NP-movement (i.e., passives, subject-raising structures) derived sentences. Throughout training, generalization to untrained sentences relying on both types of movement was tested. The influence of training on aspects of narrative discourse also was examined. Results showed generalization patterns constrained to type of movement: Training wh-movement structures resulted in generalized production of untrained wh-movement structures without influencing production of NP-movement structures. Similarly, training of NP-movement structures resulted in generalization only to other sentence types also relying on NP-movement. Aspects of sentence production in narrative contexts also was improved with treatment. These data indicate that movement to an argument (A) position as in NP-movement is distinct from movement to a nonargument (A-bar) position, required in wh-movement. The site where movement terminates in the s-structure of noncanonical sentences appears to influence sentence production. These findings show that linguistic properties of sentences influence sentence production breakdown and recovery in aphasia.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institutes of Health (NIDCD) grants DC01948 and DC00494. The authors wish to extend their appreciation to the individuals with aphasia who participated in this research. We also wish to thank Beverly Wulfeck and two anonymous reviewers for their helpful suggestions.
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