Perceptual Evaluation of Tracheoesophageal Speech by Naive and Experienced Judges Through the Use of Semantic Differential Scales The present study was conducted to investigate voice quality in tracheoesophageal speech by means of perceptual evaluations and to develop a clinically useful subset of perceptual scales sufficient for these perceptual evaluations. The perceptual ratings were obtained from both naive and trained raters (speechlanguage pathologists [SLPs]) after listening to a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2003
Perceptual Evaluation of Tracheoesophageal Speech by Naive and Experienced Judges Through the Use of Semantic Differential Scales
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Corina J. van As
    Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital and Institute of Phonetic Sciences, University of Amsterdam
  • Florien J. Koopmans-van Beinum
    Institute of Phonetic Sciences, University of Amsterdam
  • Louis C. W. Pols
    Institute of Phonetic Sciences, University of Amsterdam
  • Frans J. M. Hilgers
    Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam
  • Contact author: Corina J. van As, Department of Otolaryn-gology-Head & Neck Surgery, the Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066CX, The Netherlands. E-mail: c.v.as@nki.nl
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2003
Perceptual Evaluation of Tracheoesophageal Speech by Naive and Experienced Judges Through the Use of Semantic Differential Scales
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2003, Vol. 46, 947-959. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/074)
History: Received February 6, 2002 , Accepted February 3, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2003, Vol. 46, 947-959. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/074)
History: Received February 6, 2002; Accepted February 3, 2003

The present study was conducted to investigate voice quality in tracheoesophageal speech by means of perceptual evaluations and to develop a clinically useful subset of perceptual scales sufficient for these perceptual evaluations. The perceptual ratings were obtained from both naive and trained raters (speechlanguage pathologists [SLPs]) after listening to a read-aloud text. The perceptual evaluations were performed by means of 19 semantic bipolar 7-point scales for the naive raters and 20 semantic bipolar 7-point scales for the trained raters. The trained raters were also asked to judge the overall voice quality as good, reasonable, or poor. Both naive listeners and trained SLPs were able to perform reliable perceptual judgments. Naive raters judged the tracheoesophageal voice as more deviant than the trained raters did. Naive raters made judgments based on 2 underlying perceptual dimensions (voice quality and pitch), whereas the trained raters made judgments based on 4 underlying perceptual dimensions (voice quality, tonicity, pitch, and tempo). These perceptual dimensions were further subdivided into a subset of 4 perceptual scales for the naive raters and a subset of 8 perceptual scales for the trained raters. This appeared to provide a sufficient coverage of the underlying perceptual dimensions used by the listeners.

Acknowledgments
This study was partially supported by a grant from the Amsterdam Center for Language and Communication, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and by the Department of Speech and Language, Catholic University of Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. The Maurits and Anna de Kock Foundation provided financial support for the equipment needed for the speech recordings and the listening experiment. We thank Guus Hart and Toni Rietveld for their help with the statistics; Rianne Polak, Benita Scholtens, and Brigitte Boon-Kamma for their participation in the listening experiment; and all of the patients and the naive listeners for their participation in this study.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access