Collaborative Referencing Between Individuals With Aphasia and Routine Communication Partners H. H. Clark (1992) argues that successful referencing depends on speakers and listeners working together to establish shared perspectives on target objects. In his collaborative referencing model, he identifies 3 phases in the referencing process: initiation, refashioning, and acceptance. For referencing tasks, successful collaboration can be seen in the streamlining ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2003
Collaborative Referencing Between Individuals With Aphasia and Routine Communication Partners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie A. Hengst
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Contact author: Julie A. Hengst, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois, 901 S. Sixth Street, MC-482, Champaign, IL 61820. E-mail: hengst@uiuc.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2003
Collaborative Referencing Between Individuals With Aphasia and Routine Communication Partners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2003, Vol. 46, 831-848. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/065)
History: Received August 18, 2002 , Accepted February 11, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2003, Vol. 46, 831-848. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/065)
History: Received August 18, 2002; Accepted February 11, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 19

H. H. Clark (1992) argues that successful referencing depends on speakers and listeners working together to establish shared perspectives on target objects. In his collaborative referencing model, he identifies 3 phases in the referencing process: initiation, refashioning, and acceptance. For referencing tasks, successful collaboration can be seen in the streamlining of referencing expressions and in the decrease of overt collaborative effort across trials. Although previous studies have shown that speakers with aphasia can be successful on referencing tasks, they have not examined how that success is achieved through the collaborative work of the partners. Using a referencing task adapted from H. H. Clark and D. Wilkes-Gibbs (1986), this study examined how 4 adults with moderate-to-severe aphasia collaborated with routine communication partners (spouses or children). Overall, these pairs completed the referencing task trials with 96% accuracy and displayed referencing processes that generally conformed to Clark's collaborative referencing model. Close analysis of the discourse of these interactions revealed patterns of collaboration that went beyond Clark's model—the pairs used diverse verbal and nonverbal resources, actively negotiated the task across trials, and layered their own personal goals and perspectives onto these interactions. This study highlights the plasticity of functional communication (the diversity of ways the pairs worked together to complete the same task) and points to the importance of understanding processes of tacit learning that take place in social interactions.

Acknowledgments
The research presented here was, in part, presented at the ASHA 2001 Convention in New Orleans, LA. This work was supported by a Mary Jane Neer Research Grant from the College of Applied Life Studies, University of Illinois. I also gratefully acknowledge the participants’ commitment to, and enthusiastic participation in, the data collection phase of this project. In addition, I wish to thank Peggy J. Miller, Paul A. Prior, Katharine H. Odell, Ruth V. Watkins, and George A. Kamberelis for insightful and supportive feedback provided throughout the research.
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