Changes in the Nature of Sentence Production During the Period of Grammatical Development The sentence production capabilities of young children undergo major changes during the same period in which grammar develops. This article reports data from a cross-sectional sample of 52 children between the ages of 1;10 (years; months) and 4;0, and looks specifically at the dichotomy between stalls, sentence disruptions that are ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2003
Changes in the Nature of Sentence Production During the Period of Grammatical Development
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Matthew Rispoli
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb
  • Contact author: Matthew Rispoli, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115. E-mail: mrispoli@niu.edu
Article Information
Development / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2003
Changes in the Nature of Sentence Production During the Period of Grammatical Development
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2003, Vol. 46, 818-830. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/064)
History: Received May 1, 2002 , Accepted February 11, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2003, Vol. 46, 818-830. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/064)
History: Received May 1, 2002; Accepted February 11, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 31

The sentence production capabilities of young children undergo major changes during the same period in which grammar develops. This article reports data from a cross-sectional sample of 52 children between the ages of 1;10 (years; months) and 4;0, and looks specifically at the dichotomy between stalls, sentence disruptions that are the result of glitches in sentence production, and revisions, sentence disruptions that involve self-monitoring and the rapid replacement of words or morphosyntactic alternatives. It was found that revision rate increased with level of grammatical development, but that stall rate was not related to grammatical development. These results indicate that children's capacities for self-monitoring and maintenance of multiple linguistic alternatives increase during the period of grammatical development.

Acknowledgments
I would like to thank Decemna Chow, Sarah Dufek, Paula Finney, Sonya Givan, and Anne Goodrich for their work in transcribing the language samples that form the basis of this study. I would like to thank Faye Campagna, Michelle Hill, Melissa Menge, Sonia Pacini, and Sarah Perrie for their help in coding these data. I am especially grateful to Jill Hoover, Julie Hollich, Lynette Leombruni, and Kristi Walkington for their industriousness and good cheer in the final phases of this work. I would like to thank Melissa Menge and Pamela Hadley for their insights on theoretical and empirical issues in this study. I would like to acknowledge the National Science Foundation Grant SBR-9507849 and National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R03DC03987–03. I humbly wish to express my gratitude to the parents and the children who participated in this study for their cooperation. This work is dedicated to those children.
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