More on the Role of the Mandible in Speech Production Clinical Correlates of Green, Moore, and Reilly’s (2002) Findings Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   August 01, 2003
More on the Role of the Mandible in Speech Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James Paul Dworkin
    Department of Otolaryngology, Head, and Neck Surgery Wayne State University, School of Medicine Detroit, MI
  • Robert J. Meleca
    Department of Otolaryngology, Head, and Neck Surgery Wayne State University, School of Medicine Detroit, MI
  • Robert J. Stachler
    Department of Otolaryngology, Head, and Neck Surgery Wayne State University, School of Medicine Detroit, MI
  • Contact author: James Paul Dworkin, PhD, Department of Otolaryngology, WSU, 5E-UHC, Detroit, MI 48201. E-mail: aa1544@wayne.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   August 01, 2003
More on the Role of the Mandible in Speech Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2003, Vol. 46, 1016-1019. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/079)
History: Received May 30, 2002 , Accepted January 28, 2003
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2003, Vol. 46, 1016-1019. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/079)
History: Received May 30, 2002; Accepted January 28, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2
We would like to comment on Green, Moore, and Reilly’s article, which appeared in the February 2002 issue of this journal. In that investigation, these clinical researchers examined upper lip, lower lip, and mandibular movements during repetitive bisyllable word productions by infants, toddlers, young children, and adults with normal developmental and neurologic histories. Kinematic traces from these articulators were analyzed using a computer-based movement tracking system. Results revealed that these oral structures may have sequential neuromotor developmental schedules, characterized by more mature movement patterns for speech emerging earlier in the mandible than in either the upper or lower lip. That is, that normal speech development involves the integration of lip and tongue activities into a more well-established, biomechanically dominant jaw operating sensorimotor system. To facilitate our response to this investigation, we have chosen first to extend the results by elaborating on the causally related role of the mandible in certain speech disordered populations, and second, to highlight how adjunctive methods of data collection may have strengthened the validity of the overall findings.
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