Two Models of Grammar Facilitation in Children With Language Impairments Phase 2 Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1997
Two Models of Grammar Facilitation in Children With Language Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center Kansas City
  • Patricia L. Cleave
    Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Steven H. Long
    Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: mfey@kumc.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1997
Two Models of Grammar Facilitation in Children With Language Impairments
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 5-19. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.05
History: Received April 2, 1996 , Accepted June 25, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 5-19. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.05
History: Received April 2, 1996; Accepted June 25, 1996

Fey, Cleave, Long, and Hughes (1993) demonstrated the effectiveness of two 5-month interventions for preschoolers with problems in expressive grammar. This article reports the results of an additional 5-month intervention phase for 18 of the original participants. Results indicated that although participants improved during Phase 2, improvements generally were not as strong as those noted for Phase 1. Gains were larger and more consistent for children who received the relatively costly clinician-administered approach than for those who received a less expensive parent-administered intervention. The parent intervention was successful in helping parents to use sentence recasts, and especially so for parents of children at relatively early stages of grammatical development. Finally, children who were dismissed after a highly successful treatment Phase 1 generally exhibited no gains over the no-treatment Phase 2.

Acknowledgments
This study was conducted in London, Ontario, Canada, while the first two authors were at the University of Western Ontario. It was presented in part at the 1993 Symposium on Research in Child Language Disorders, Madison, WI. The research was sponsored by the Ministry of Community and Social Services, Ontario. This funding was administered by the Research and Program Evaluation Unit in cooperation with the Ontario Mental Health Foundation and was funded from the MCSS Research Grants Program. We also gratefully acknowledge equipment contributions from the Ontario District Association of the Society for the Preservation of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America (the Barbershoppers). Able assistance was provided by Kit Dench, Sarah Hawkins, Diana Hughes, David Loyst, Dan MacDougald, Chris Matthews, Cathy Moran, Sheila Murray, Anna Ravida, Brenda Ushiki, and Joanne Wickware. Special thanks are due Lynn Dupuis for her assistance in data analysis and interpretation.
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