The Influence of Peer Models on the Play Scripts of Children With Specific Language Impairment This investigation included two phases of inquiry that examined the effects of peer modeling upon the play scripts of children with specific language impairment (SLI). The first study employed a pretest-posttest control group design involving two groups of children with SLI (10 who participated in the experimental treatment and 10 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1997
The Influence of Peer Models on the Play Scripts of Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shari Brand Robertson
    Department of Communicative Disorders University of Wisconsin - Madison and Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development Madison, WI
  • Susan Ellis Weismer
    Department of Communicative Disorders University of Wisconsin - Madison and Waisman Center on Mental Retardation and Human Development Madison, WI
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1997
The Influence of Peer Models on the Play Scripts of Children With Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 49-61. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.49
History: Received July 7, 1995 , Accepted July 30, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 49-61. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.49
History: Received July 7, 1995; Accepted July 30, 1996

This investigation included two phases of inquiry that examined the effects of peer modeling upon the play scripts of children with specific language impairment (SLI). The first study employed a pretest-posttest control group design involving two groups of children with SLI (10 who participated in the experimental treatment and 10 controls) and a group of peer models (10 children with normal language development). The treatment involved dyadic play sessions in which children with SLI were paired with a normal language peer model. Significant differences were found between the play script reports of the experimental (SLI-E) and control groups (SLI-C) of children with specific language impairment. The second study, utilizing single-case methodology, involved 6 children with SLI who participated in the control group of Study 1, plus 2 peer models. Play dyads consisted of either two children with SLI or one child with SLI and a normal language peer. Results of this study provided support for the contention that play interactions with normal language peers facilitates increases in the play-script reports of children with SLI.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank the parents and children from the West Bend School District who participated in this study. We are also grateful to Sandy Krautkramer and Julie Jacquot who tolerated many disruptions to their normally tranquil classrooms.
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