Interaction Among Preschoolers With and Without Disabilities Effects of Across-the-Day Peer Intervention Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1997
Interaction Among Preschoolers With and Without Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Howard Goldstein
    University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA
  • Kris English
    University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA
  • Karin Shafer
    University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA
  • Louise Kaczmarek
    University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA
  • Currently affiliated with Florida State University, Tallahassee
    Currently affiliated with Florida State University, Tallahassee×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1997
Interaction Among Preschoolers With and Without Disabilities
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 33-48. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.33
History: Received February 21, 1995 , Accepted July 30, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 33-48. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.33
History: Received February 21, 1995; Accepted July 30, 1996

We examined the effects of a peer-mediated intervention package that taught typically developing children to be more aware of communicative attempts of classmates with disabilities, to use a small set of facilitative strategies ("Stay, play, talk"), and to distribute strategy use across the school day. A multiple baseline design across subjects was instituted with two cohorts of preschool children. Following baseline observations, a total of 8 target children with moderate developmental disabilities were eventually paired with trained peers who received "buddy training." Once trained peers were taught facilitative strategies and encouraged to use them during classroom activities, consistent improvements in social interaction on the part of the trained peers and target children were demonstrated. Similar or more frequent interactions were demonstrated when trained peers were reassigned to different target children during generalization probes. In addition, treatment effects were revealed when comparing sequential analyses applied to the specific communicative behaviors across experimental conditions, in changes in target children's sociometric ratings, and in social validity judgments of videotapes from before and after treatment. This peer intervention approach has promise for improving the communicative interaction and social integration of children with disabilities attending inclusive preschools.

Acknowledgments
Support for this research was provided by Grant No. H023C10167 from the U.S. Department of Education awarded to the University of Pittsburgh. We are grateful to the children, teachers, and parents of the DART Preschool Program, whose cooperation made this study possible.
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