Precision of Tympanometric Measurements In both scientific and clinical investigations, precision of instruments is demanded. Precision of tympanometric measures has been reported in the literature rarely, and studies are generally not comparable. This study introduces a new method of determining precision of tympanometric variables. Forty-three participants in good health were investigated. Static compliance, middle ... Research Note
Research Note  |   February 01, 1997
Precision of Tympanometric Measurements
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael Gaihede
    Department of Otolaryngology Aarhus University Hospital Aarhus, Denmark
  • Therese Ovesen
    Department of Otolaryngology Aarhus University Hospital Aarhus, Denmark
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Note
Research Note   |   February 01, 1997
Precision of Tympanometric Measurements
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 215-222. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.215
History: Received October 19, 1995 , Accepted October 1, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 215-222. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.215
History: Received October 19, 1995; Accepted October 1, 1996

In both scientific and clinical investigations, precision of instruments is demanded. Precision of tympanometric measures has been reported in the literature rarely, and studies are generally not comparable. This study introduces a new method of determining precision of tympanometric variables. Forty-three participants in good health were investigated. Static compliance, middle ear pressure, and gradient were recorded in a test-retest design. Plots of test versus retest measurements were constructed for each variable, after which differences between measurements were plotted against their means. The standard deviation of the distribution of differences provides a measure of precision: the coefficient of repeatability. Static compliance showed a significant disagreement between measurements; hence repeatability was poor, which can be explained by preconditioning of the tympanic membrane. Middle ear pressure and gradient showed good agreement between measurements, and comparable measures of precision are reported. The method is simple and based on two repeated measurements in each subject; the design is ethical and practical in clinical investigations.

Acknowledgments
We wish to thank Dr. Hans Skouby and Mrs. Emma Skouby's Foundation for kindly supporting the present study. We gratefully acknowledge the helpful comments of anonymous reviewers on an earlier draft of the manuscript.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access