Signaling of Noncomprehension by Children and Adolescents With Mental Retardation Effects of Problem Type and Speaker Identity Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1997
Signaling of Noncomprehension by Children and Adolescents With Mental Retardation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Leonard Abbeduto
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Katherine Short-Meyerson
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Glenis Benson
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Joanna Dolish
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1997
Signaling of Noncomprehension by Children and Adolescents With Mental Retardation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 20-32. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.20
History: Received September 11, 1995 , Accepted July 30, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 20-32. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.20
History: Received September 11, 1995; Accepted July 30, 1996

Previous research has demonstrated considerable within-individual and within- group variability in the signaling of noncomprehension by persons with mental retardation. The first purpose of this study was to determine whether within- individual variability in such signaling was related to differences in the nature of the inadequate message and the identity of the speaker. The second purpose was to evaluate the relationship between within-group variability in noncomprehension signaling and measures of cognition, receptive and expressive language ability, speech intelligibility, and social cognition. Participants were school-age individuals with mild mental retardation and typically developing children matched to them on nonverbal MA. Noncomprehension signaling was examined in a direction-following task in which inadequate message type and speaker were manipulated. It was found that message type, but not speaker, influenced noncomprehension signaling, with no difference between the two groups. We also found that performance on a test of receptive language ability was the best predictor of noncomprehension signaling for persons with mental retardation.

Acknowledgments
The research reported was supported by NICHD grants R01 HD24356 and P30 HD03352. The authors are indebted to the students, staff, and parents of the following schools: Cherokee Middle School, Country View Elementary School, Creative Learning Preschool, Holy Cross Lutheran School, LaFollette High School, Our Redeemer Lutheran School, Schenk Middle School, St. Coletta School, St. Peter's Elementary School, Stoughton High School, Verona Area High School, and the Waisman Early Childhood Program. Thanks also to Karen Koerber, Terrie Kriesler, Marina Memmo, and Jessica Snyder for transcribing the expressive language samples. Portions of this paper were presented at the 1994 annual conference of the American Association on Mental Retardation, San Francisco, CA.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access