Cochlear Implant Use by Prelingually Deafened Children The Influences of Age at Implant and Length of Device Use Research Article
Research Article  |   February 1997
Cochlear Implant Use by Prelingually Deafened Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Holly Fryauf-Bertschy
    The University of Iowa Department of Otolaryngology Iowa City
  • Richard S. Tyler
    The University of Iowa Department of Otolaryngology Iowa City
  • Danielle M. R. Kelsay
    The University of Iowa Department of Otolaryngology Iowa City
  • Bruce J. Gantz
    The University of Iowa Department of Otolaryngology Iowa City
  • George G. Woodworth
    The University of Iowa Department of Otolaryngology Iowa City
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 1997
Cochlear Implant Use by Prelingually Deafened Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 183-199. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.183
History: Received January 3, 1995 , Accepted August 21, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 183-199. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.183
History: Received January 3, 1995; Accepted August 21, 1996

This study focused on the long-term speech perception performances of 34 prelingually deafened children who received multichannel cochlear implants manufactured by Cochlear Corporation. The children were grouped by the age at which they received cochlear implants and were characterized by the amount of time they used their devices per day. A variety of speech perception tests were administered to the children at annual intervals following the connection of the external implant hardware. No significant differences in performance are evident for children implanted before age 5 compared to children implanted after age 5 on closed-set tests of speech perception ability. All children demonstrated an improvement in performance compared to the pre-operative condition. Open-set word recognition performance is significantly better for children implanted before age 5 compared to children implanted after age 5 at the 36-month test interval and the 48-month test interval. User status, defined by the amount of daily use of the implant, significantly affects all measures of speech perception performance except pattern perception.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by research grant number 2 P50 DC 00242 awarded to the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Iowa, from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health; grant RR00059 from the General Clinical Research Centers Program, Division of Research Resources, NIH; the Lions Clubs International Foundation; and the Iowa Lions Foundation.
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