Selected Temporal, Grammatical, and Phonological Characteristics of Conversational Utterances Produced by Children Who Stutter The purpose of this study was to assess clause, syllable, and response latency characteristics of conversational utterances produced by children who stutter. Subjects were 14 boys who stutter (M age = 52.07 months; SD = 9.02 months) and 14 boys who do not stutter (M age = 51.93 months; SD ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1997
Selected Temporal, Grammatical, and Phonological Characteristics of Conversational Utterances Produced by Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenneth J. Logan
    University of Florida Gainesville
  • Edward G. Conture
    Syracuse University Syracuse, NY
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: logan@cpd.ufl.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1997
Selected Temporal, Grammatical, and Phonological Characteristics of Conversational Utterances Produced by Children Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 107-120. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.107
History: Received April 25, 1996 , Accepted August 14, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1997, Vol. 40, 107-120. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4001.107
History: Received April 25, 1996; Accepted August 14, 1996

The purpose of this study was to assess clause, syllable, and response latency characteristics of conversational utterances produced by children who stutter. Subjects were 14 boys who stutter (M age = 52.07 months; SD = 9.02 months) and 14 boys who do not stutter (M age = 51.93 months; SD = 8.55 months). Selected aspects of speech fluency, clause and syllable structure, and response latency were analyzed in utterances collected from each subject as he spoke with his mother during a 30-minute conversation. Results indicated that stuttered utterances of children who stutter contained significantly more clausal constituents than their length-matched fluent utterances. There was, however, no significant difference in syllable structure of the length-matched utterances, and neither stuttering frequency nor duration was significantly associated with syllable structure measures. Further, there was no significant difference in response latency of non-length-matched stuttered and fluent utterances. Findings are taken to suggest that changes in the number of clausal constituents that must be constructed, stored, or coordinated within an utterance may influence the likelihood of speech errors and, hence, speech disfluencies within that utterance.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by an NIH Grant (DC00523) to Syracuse University and was completed as part of the first author's doctoral dissertation. The authors would like to acknowledge the following individuals: Lisa R. LaSalle, Linda J. Louko, and J. Scott Yaruss for their assistance with data collection; Marie Ward for her assistance with interjudge measurement reliability; Mary Louise Edwards, Linda M. Milosky, Ben C. Watson, and three anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments about earlier drafts of this paper. Also, we are grateful to the parents and children who participated in this study.
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