Narrative Development in Late Talkers Early School Age Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1996
Narrative Development in Late Talkers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rhea Paul
    Portland State University Portland, OR
  • Rita Hernandez
    Portland State University Portland, OR
  • Lisa Taylor
    Portland State University Portland, OR
  • Karen Johnson
    Portland State University Portland, OR
  • Contact author: Rhea Paul, PhD, Speech and Hearing Sciences Program, Portland State University, P. O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207. Email: rhea@nhl.nh.pdx.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1996
Narrative Development in Late Talkers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1996, Vol. 39, 1295-1303. doi:10.1044/jshr.3906.1295
History: Received July 5, 1995 , Accepted June 11, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1996, Vol. 39, 1295-1303. doi:10.1044/jshr.3906.1295
History: Received July 5, 1995; Accepted June 11, 1996

Children with slow expressive language development (SELD) as toddlers and a control group of children with normal language development (NL) were followed to early school age. Children with SELD were, at that point, subdivided into two groups: those who had moved within the normal range of expressive language (the History of Expressive Language Delay [HELD] subgroup); and those who continued to score below the normal range in expressive language at school age (the Expressive Language Delay [ELD] subgroup). During their kindergarten, first, and second grade years, they were administered a narrative generation task. Narratives were analyzed for MLU, lexical diversity, amount of information included, proportion of complete cohesive ties, and overall stage of narrative maturity. In kindergarten, children with normal language history scored significantly higher than those with HELD and ELD on lexical diversity and narrative stage; and higher than those with ELD in proportion of complete cohesive ties. In first grade, children with normal language history again scored significantly higher than those with HELD and ELD on narrative maturity, with no other significant differences. In second grade, there were no significant differences among the groups.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by grants from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (DC00793), the Meyer Memorial Trust, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation, and Portland State University. I would like to thank the Statistical Consulting Laboratory at Portland State University for its assistance in analyzing these data.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access