Interactive Focused Stimulation for Toddlers With Expressive Vocabulary Delays This study explores the effects of training parents to administer focused stimulation intervention to teach specific target words to their toddlers with expressive vocabulary delays. Twenty-five mothers and their late-talking toddlers were randomly assigned to treatment and delayed-treatment (control) groups. Vocabulary targets were individually selected for each toddler based on ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1996
Interactive Focused Stimulation for Toddlers With Expressive Vocabulary Delays
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Luigi Girolametto
    University of Toronto Ontario, Canada
  • Patsy Steig Pearce
    Centenary Health Centre Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Elaine Weitzman
    The Hanen Centre Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Contact author: Luigi Girolametto, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, 6 Queen’s Park Crescent West, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3H2. Email: I.girolametto@utoronto.ca
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1996
Interactive Focused Stimulation for Toddlers With Expressive Vocabulary Delays
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1996, Vol. 39, 1274-1283. doi:10.1044/jshr.3906.1274
History: Received November 8, 1995 , Accepted June 6, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1996, Vol. 39, 1274-1283. doi:10.1044/jshr.3906.1274
History: Received November 8, 1995; Accepted June 6, 1996

This study explores the effects of training parents to administer focused stimulation intervention to teach specific target words to their toddlers with expressive vocabulary delays. Twenty-five mothers and their late-talking toddlers were randomly assigned to treatment and delayed-treatment (control) groups. Vocabulary targets were individually selected for each toddler based on the child's phonetic repertoire and parent report of vocabulary development. Following treatment, mothers' language input was slower, less complex, and more focused than mothers in the control group. Concomitantly, their children used more target words in naturalistic probes, used more words in free-play interaction, and were reported to have larger vocabularies overall as measured by parent report. In addition, the treatment had an effect on language development—children in the experimental group used more multiword combinations and early morphemes than children in the control group. The implications of these results are discussed with regard to the role of focused stimulation intervention for children with expressive vocabulary delays.

Acknowledgments
This study was sponsored by a grant from National Health, Research, Development Program of Health and Welfare Canada. We thank Fern Sussman, The Hanen Centre, for her contributions to the development of the program content and format, and Gary Kapelus, Centenary Health Centre, for his assistance in making this study possible at this centre. We especially thank Maureen O’Keefe, research officer, for her guidance, patience, and help in every step of this project, from recruitment to assessment and data transcription. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Suzanne Coxon for program delivery and Cheryl Shuster and Barb Wylde for conducting posttest assessments. Above all, we are deeply appreciative of the participation of the mothers and their children.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access