Effects of a Metronome on the Filled Pauses of Fluent Speakers Filled pauses (the "ums" and "uhs" that litter spontaneous speech) seem to be a product of the speaker paying deliberate attention to the normally automatic act of talking. This is the same sort of explanation that has been offered for stuttering. In this paper we explore whether a manipulation that ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 1996
Effects of a Metronome on the Filled Pauses of Fluent Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nicholas Christenfeld
    University of California, San Diego
  • Contact author: Nicholas Christenfeld, PhD, Department of Psychology 0109, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0109. Email: nicko@ucsd.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   December 01, 1996
Effects of a Metronome on the Filled Pauses of Fluent Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1996, Vol. 39, 1232-1238. doi:10.1044/jshr.3906.1232
History: Received January 26, 1996 , Accepted July 9, 1996
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1996, Vol. 39, 1232-1238. doi:10.1044/jshr.3906.1232
History: Received January 26, 1996; Accepted July 9, 1996

Filled pauses (the "ums" and "uhs" that litter spontaneous speech) seem to be a product of the speaker paying deliberate attention to the normally automatic act of talking. This is the same sort of explanation that has been offered for stuttering. In this paper we explore whether a manipulation that has long been known to decrease stuttering, synchronizing speech to the beats of a metronome, will then also decrease filled pauses. Two experiments indicate that a metronome has a dramatic effect on the production of filled pauses. This effect is not due to any simplification or slowing of the speech and supports the view that a metronome causes speakers to attend more to how they are talking and less to what they are saying. It also lends support to the connection between stutters and filled pauses.

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